Books for 6th through 8th Graders

war.jpg

An exceptionally moving story of triumph against all odds set during World War 2, from the acclaimed author of Jefferson’s Sons and for fans of Number the Stars. &; Nine-year-old Ada has never left her one-room apartment. Her mother is too humiliated by Ada’s twisted foot to let her outside. So when her little brother Jamie is shipped out of London to escape the war, Ada doesn’t waste a minute–she sneaks out to join him. &; So begins a new adventure of Ada, and for Susan Smith, the woman who is forced to take the two kids in. As Ada teaches herself to ride a pony, learns to read, and watches for German spies, she begins to trust Susan–and Susan begins to love Ada and Jamie. But in the end, will their bond be enough to hold them together through wartime? Or will Ada and her brother fall back into the cruel hands of their mother? &; This masterful work of historical fiction is equal parts adventure and a moving tale of family and identity–a classic in the making.

 

oller.jpg

“For most of her twelve years, Astrid has done everything with her best friend Nicole. But after Astrid falls in love with roller derby and signs up for derby camp, Nicole decides to go to dance camp instead. And so begins the most difficult summer of Astrid’s life as she struggles to keep up with the older girls at camp, hang on to the friend she feels slipping away, and cautiously embark on a new friendship. As the end of summer nears and her first roller derby bout (and junior high!) draws closer, Astrid realizes that maybe she is strong enough to handle the bout, a lost friendship, and middle school . . . in short, strong enough to be a roller girl. In this graphic novel debut that earned a Newbery Honor and five starred reviews, real-life derby girl Victoria Jamieson has created an inspiring coming-of-age story about friendship, perseverence, and girl power!”

 

george.jpg

Melissa is like many other fourth-grade girls; she loves fashion magazines, experimenting with hairstyles, and talking with her best friend. But the outside world sees her as the gender to which she was born, not the one with which she identifies; they see her as George. Nailing the younger middle grade voice, Gino offers a straightforward and authentic story, crafting a character whose universal need for recognition and acceptance will be embraced by all readers.

jelly.jpg

Unable to accept that her best friend Franny drowned, Suzy determines to find a rational, scientific explanation for this devastating loss. She sets her mind on the deadly Irukandji jellyfish and contacts a scientist on the other side of the world to help prove her theory. Through flashbacks, readers learn about the last few months of Suzy’s relationship with Franny and the overwhelming guilt she cannot face. A potent exploration of grief and resilience.

alam.png

In this follow-up to One Crazy Summer(2010) and P.S. Be Eleven (2013), the intrepid Gaither sisters travel from their home in Brooklyn to visit their relatives in rural Alabama. Delphine, Vonetta, and Fern become embroiled in family drama and end up taking sides in the divisive dynamics. Yet when a natural disaster occurs, several generations of relatives pull together, and Delphine learns a bit about mercy and the true meaning of sisterhood.

stranger

Bridge finds herself growing apart from her best friends, Sherm writes letters to a now-absent grandfather whom he desperately misses, and, unable to face a day at school, an unnamed girl roams the streets. Displaying an intuitive understanding of the fraught period between childhood and adolescence, Stead deftly blends multiple threads and perspectives to tell a quirky and tender coming-of-age story laced with themes of gender, identity, loss, and the complexity of friendship.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s